Trey McIntyre Project. Photo by (c) Lois Greenfield

Next up, the Segerstrom Center for the Arts’ International Dance Series:

  • Mariinsky Ballet and Orchestra, “Swan Lake,” Oct. 2-7
  • Trey McIntyre Project, Nov. 23-25
  • Hamburg Ballet, “The Little Mermaid,” Feb. 8-10, 2013
  • Eifman Ballet of St. Petersburg, “Rodin,” May 3-5, 2013

The lowdown:

As mentioned in an earlier blog post, the Center has decreased the number of performances of each dance company this season, except for the Mariinsky, which is presenting that audience favorite, “Swan Lake.” The Center is also bringing in fewer companies than in recent years, though there have been other seasons with four companies only. It’s clear, however, that the poor economy  is having an impact on the dance season at the Segerstrom Center, which has been a leader in dance in Southern California.

The Mariinsky presented “Swan Lake” at the Center once before, in October 2006. This time, they will be fielding four different principal casts. Of note are Victoria Tereshkina and Vladimir Schklyarov (Oct. 2 & 5) and Ekaterina Kondaurova and Danila Korsuntsev (Oct. 6 at 2 p.m.); Oxana Skorik (Oct. 4 & 7) has been getting good press and is mentioned as a rising star.

The Center has commissioned a new outdoor work from Trey McIntyre Project (TMP), which will be performed on the Plaza. (TMP dancers Travis Walker, Ashley Werhun and John Michael Schert, in the photo above.) Earlier this year, TMP participated in a U.S. State Department oversees tour called DanceMotion USA (sm). TMP performed in South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines, and worked with local dancers in each of those countries. McIntyre then selected the Korean National Contemporary Dance to come to the US to perform with his group. The Center is expected to make an announcement with more details soon.

Hamburg Ballet will be making its third visit to the Center, presenting its adult version of the Hans Christian Andersen fable, “The Little Mermaid.” Executive Vice President Judy Morr is a huge fan of the ballets of John Neumeier, the company’s American-born artistic director and chief choreographer. San Francisco Ballet performed Neumeier’s “The Little Mermaid” in 2010; it was such a hit with SFB audiences that they reprised it in 2011, at which time it was also recorded for broadcast on PBS’ “Great Performances’ Dance in America.” The ballet was originally made for the Royal Danish Ballet in 2005 to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Andersen’s birth; the Hamburg version was created in 2007. Parents should know this ballet does NOT follow the Disney story line! Go back and read the Andersen tale, which I need to do, too. But I know this much — it’s not a happy ending.

And, finally, Eifman Ballet returns to the Center because, I was told, he has a devoted and loyal following. I have admired his ballet “Red Giselle,” but I am certainly not an Eifman acolyte. Enough said.

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